Warning, this may offend!

In my most recent review, posted yesterday,Book Review: The Macabre Masterpiece: Poems of Horror and Gore, I made comments on the author’s writing style, namely poetry that rhymes, and respectfully and honestly expressed my opinion on such things.  Well, my review was not met favorably when it went live on Goodreads.com.  I received a message in my inbox asking me to remove the review, something that had never occurred before, not that I’ve written many negative reviews before, but still it was quite a shock.

Apparently my honest and unbiased review of the author’s poetry and my comments on his writing style were taken too personally and he wanted the review and ratings removed because they would not be good for his book.  Now, for an author, who mind you, is LOOKING to have their publication reviewed, some form of comment on the style of their writing would be expected would it not? Especially if the book is something that is not traditional, like poetry.  Apparently, in being grilled twice about my like for poetry, I was to know that every piece in the fifty piece collection rhymed – unfortunately for him my ability to know all was broken that day because, while I was prepared for some rhyming, I was not prepared for every piece to rhyme.

Upon looking at the other reviews posted on goodreads.com (and there weren’t that many) most were five stars, which I do not agree with, and there was a single paragraph three star review.  Which did not do any form of in-depth review of the pieces being presented in the collection or do much on the book as a whole, but in the Author’s opinion this singular paragraph was much more worthy of remaining than something more in-depth.  Mind-boggling.  Below, you will find my most recent response to his comments stating that essentially my review was seen more as a personal attack to his writing style than a review/critique upon his book.

Poetry, is not all rhymes. Yes, there were comments on the style, the rhyming. There were comments on the book. I was honest. I do like poetry. I write poetry, and not all of it rhymes. Yes, I am going to comment on a style of a book, especially if I do not like it. It is part of a review. The style of writing makes up the entire publication as much as the content.

Yes, I have issue with that style of poetry, so yes, it will be one of the key factors in my dislike for your book. There were points that I did like in your book and I did mention those, but again my biggest issue is with that particular style of poetry.

It is not against your writing, you are taking it too personally. It is against that particular style of POETRY. My dislike for that particular type of poetry is not in any way, shape or form a reflection of my like or dislike for the WRITER of that particular type of poetry. I have friends who write poetry and they write rhyming poetry, I do not often read their rhyming poetry, but I am still friends with them.

I have removed the review from goodreads, but I am keeping it at my blog. My rating will NOT in any way, shape or form be removed from that review. I have kept a link to my blog in that review in case individuals do wish to go read my review. You chose to be published, you chose this particular path in life. People disliking your style of writing is going to happen, people disliking your book is going to happen. Negativity towards your book or your style of writing is going to happen, wanted or not, and you can’t constantly go around shutting down and expecting everyone to remove every negative comment that is made about your book or your style of writing.

Yes, when you asked if I liked poetry, I was prepared for SOME rhyming, not EVERY PIECE in the collection rhyming. Nor was I prepared for the redundancies that occurred in the book, which I did point out in my review.

I am not backing down on this. Ever. I defend my reviews and my ratings. If you need a detailed breakdown of my review policies and my rating system, you can visit the following link: https://caedmoneries.wordpress.com/about/ Everything is there in plain English. Black and white, no shades of grey.

I personally take offense to the fact that I was asked to remove an honest, unbiased review of a book simply because I disliked the writing style. That is something that is absolutely ridiculous in my personal opinion. I dislike Stephanie Meyer’s writing style, but you do not see her filling my inbox with demands to remove any reviews of her books. Tessa Harris did not bombard me with comments or messages concerning my negative review and comments on her writing style for the book of hers that I could barely get through.

I will not seek any of your future publications, nor will I be recommending your publications to any of my friends simply because I wouldn’t want their honest reviews, that may or may not include comments on your writing style to upset you in the way that my honest review did.

If you note, on Goodreads.com, you will still see my rating for this book, but the review comments have been changed.  I have alerted you, my dear readers that the review on Goodreads.com has been removed at the Author’s request, and that the review will still remain here on my blog.  It isn’t going anywhere and neither am I.

Rant complete.

 

Advertisements

Book Review: The Macabre Masterpiece: Poems of Horror and Gore

Title: The Macabre Masterpiece: Poems of Horror and Gore
Author:  Justin Bienvenue
Rating: 2/5

Summary:  Have you ever wanted a tour of the infamous underground we know as Hell? To experience different angles of blood? To meet some of horrors most morbid and fearsome creatures? Or maybe you wish to get totally creeped out and be left in utter shock and suspense to the point where your heart is beating so fast but you can’t get enough!?

Review: Okay, I like poetry.  God knows I write enough of it, have written dozens of passages, large and small, but never had the urge to publish them (though that is changing).  However, the genre of horror poetry is something that intrigued me so I decided to give Justin Bienvenue’s book a chance. However, what awaited me in those pages, within those fifty in-depth poems was something that made my skin crawl worse than the horror themes that filled them.  One of my biggest issues with poetry is rhyming, not that I am completely against it, I just simply am not a fan of poems that rhyme each and every line.

If I wanted constant rhyming I would go read Dr. Seuss or something out of Mother Goose’s stories.  That does not mean that this is a bad book, in fact, once I forced myself to get beyond the every line must rhyme thing, I did enjoy some of the imagery that he created in the poems.  I did think some of them were a bit redundant, having four poems concerning the river of blood or vampires was a tad much when there was more that could be done with each of these categories in my opinion without the redundancies.

I think my favorite chapter was the last one where things took a slightly more unsettling turn in so far as things went from being physical representations of horror to being a bit more psychological.  From the Thirteen Stairs to the Inhibitors of Doom these, despite the rhyming had me sucked in because I love mess with your head imagery truth be told.

Is this something I would read again, probably not on the whole no, but I would definitely read bits and pieces of it, those that caught my attention more than others.  I wish I could give it a higher rating than I did, but unfortunately the above issues kinda prohibit me from doing that.  Very well done for a first publication and I look forward to seeing more of your work, perhaps with a little less rhyming.

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations you can contact me at simplicity.kindreth@gmail.com
My reviews can be found here:
https://caedmoneries.wordpress.com
http://www.tumblr.com/caedy
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/caesreviews

Book Review: The Anatomist’s Apprentice by Tessa Harris

Title: The Anatomists Apprentice
Author: Tessa Harris
Rating: 1/5

Summary: The death of Sir Edward Crick has unleashed a torrent of gossip through the seedy taverns and elegant ballrooms of Oxfordshire. Few mourn the dissolute young man—except his sister, the beautiful Lady Lydia Farrell. When her husband comes under suspicion of murder, she seeks expert help from Dr. Thomas Silkstone, a young anatomist from Philadelphia.

Thomas arrived in England to study under its foremost surgeon, where his unconventional methods only add to his outsider status. Against his better judgment he agrees to examine Sir Edward’s corpse. But it is not only the dead, but also the living, to whom he must apply the keen blade of his intellect. And the deeper the doctor’s investigations go, the greater the risk that he will be consigned to the ranks of the corpses he studies… (taken from Goodreads.com)

Review: I. Could. Not. Finish. This. Book. Not even if my life depended on it. I could not stand it. Drivel, pure and simple. This book was not worth, in my opinion the accolades that it has received, nor anything higher than a one star rating (and even that may be too high in my opinion). There are a couple of things that rub me the wrong way with this book, and here they are:

1.) The man from Philadelphia constantly called “the New Englander,” if you are from Philadelphia you are NOT FROM NEW ENGLAND. If you are from Massachusetts (holy crap I’m pleased that I managed to spell that right the first time without the use of spell check), Connecticut (this one I butchered and it is easier than Massachusetts), Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, or Maine you are from New England.
2.) The Irishman in the story constantly exhibits “Gallic” charm and NOTHING ELSE! Dear god, find something else to describe him please and thank you and save my sanity.
3.) The murder victim, whose skin has turned yellow, is “livid.” Is he really now? Do we even know the definition of this word? Here, let me help you with it: having a discolored, bluish appearance caused by a bruise,congestion of blood vessels, strangulation, etc., as the face,flesh, hands, or nails. <- Tell me, does the color blue match the color yellow? No, I didn’t think so.
4.) On the same page a poor man is “distraught” more than once over a socially awkward encounter. Really? Does this need to be done on the SAME PAGE?

These are just a few of the points that rubbed me the wrong way with this book. Also, there seems to always be a “loud clank” made every time there is a chunk of a character dropped into the story. Seriously, I do not know what possessed me to even consider this book, I claim a lapse in my sanity and I will leave it at that. Will not be venturing into this world again, and I didn’t even take home the souvenir T-shirt that they offered.

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations you can contact me at simplicity.kindreth@gmail.com
My reviews can be found here:
https://caedmoneries.wordpress.com
http://www.tumblr.com/caedy
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/caesreviews

Book Review: Dreamfever by Karen Marie Moning

Title: Dreamfever
Author: Karen Marie Moning
Rating: 5/5

Summary: The walls between human and Fae worlds have come crashing down. As Mac fights for survival on Dublin’s battle-scarred streets, she will embark on the darkest-and most erotically charged-adventure of her life.

Review: After I read this fourth book in the Fever series I had three words running rampant in my head for several days before I could fully process what I had just read, those words were OH MY GOD! – circling round and round and round my head. I was floored by this one, and at the end of the third I knew something like it was going to happen, but I did not expect it to be this temperature spiking!

Mister Jericho Barrons can pretty much call me whatever the hell he wants to call me after this wonderful installment to the series. If you thought that this man was naughty in the first three books, I must inform you that you have not seen anything yet. Mister Jericho Barrons needs a spanking for all that naughtiness and I know several individuals that will agree with me on this (though truth be told I wouldn’t mind him spanking me instead – wait, I think I just said that out loud…oops!).

I do however, have a favorite scene. It is an argument that is so simple, and yet so perfectly describes the relationship between Mac and Barrons:

He shakes me. “Say my name.”
“No.”
“Damn it, would you just cooperate.”
“I do not know that word, ‘cooperate’.”
“Obviously,” he growls.
“I think you make up words.”
“I do not make up words.”
“Do, too.”
“Do not.”
“Too.”
“Not.”
I laugh.
“Woman, you make me crazed,” he mutters.

See, perfectly yet intensely complicated. This book is far from over the top, and there is plenty of build up before anything even remotely sexual happens, and even then there are unnamed extenuating circumstances that bring about the explosive release to the sexual tension.

Barrons is HOT! Dear god that man sets my blood to boil and I want to let him do dirty things to me (much like I would let Christian Grey do whatever the hell he wanted to me), and I disliked him being gone for so long, but I understood that it was at some point necessary for it to happen. This series is fast paced and not one to beat around the bush for the most part, and I am more often than not hanging on every word and waiting to find out what happens next, and then I get to the ending and for the second time I am like WHAT IN THE EFFING HELL?!

I have not yet gotten my hands on Shadowfever which is the fifth and final book in the series, and of course I will have the same dread about going into it that I do every other final book in a series, but I will know that things are going to hopefully work out in the end! They HAVE to work out in the end or I am going to lose my grip on sanity and it will be entirely KMM’s fault.

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations you can contact me at simplicity.kindreth@gmail.com
My reviews can be found here:
https://caedmoneries.wordpress.com
http://www.tumblr.com/caedy
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/caesreviews

Book Review: Beneath the Highland Mist by Karen Marie Moning

Title: Beyond the Highland Mist
Author: Karen Marie Moning
Rating: 5/5

Summary: He is a powerful laird, she a woman of the 20th century that was sent back in time by the fae. He wants her, she can’t stand beautiful men and is one of the first people in who knows how long to tell him “no” right from the start. A fun little story truth be told.

Review: I am a fan of historical romances, the time travel aspect is even more of a kicker to me if brought on by some touch of the faery folk. This series reminds me of Diana Gabaldon’s “Outlander” series in so much that you’ve a “modern” woman taken from her time and thrust into the more primitive Scottish highlands. Though Adrienne de Simone did not come through at a stone circle like the heroine in the Outlander Series, she was transported from modern day Seattle.

Adrienne’s sudden appearance causes problems for quite a few people, least of all the Laird known as Hawk who has gained his name through becoming a legendary predator on the battlefield and in the bedroom, his conquests are monumental. Each time Adrienne denies him it only strengthens his want for her, his need to possess her and ultimately he does, ultimately there is the romance that is needed between the pair of them. A good first in a series book, and now I must find more of them, because I suffer from MRBIOs (Must Read Books In Order syndrome).

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations you can contact me at simplicity.kindreth@gmail.com
My reviews can be found here:
https://caedmoneries.wordpress.com
http://www.tumblr.com/caedy
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/caesreviews

Book Review: The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

Title: The Lovely Bones
Author: Alice Sebold
Rating: 5/5

Summary: 14-year-old Susie Salmon is dead. She was murdered in a time before milk carton photos and public service announcements, in 1973 people still believed that children and people in generally just didn’t mysteriously disappear. Susie gives her personal account of what happened and her adjustment to the place that she finds herself in after her death. Susie watches her family as they go through their grief in different ways, her father’s hunt for her killer, her sister becoming more daring, and her brother building a fort in her honor to begin his own healing.

Review: I have seen the movie, and they did a very good job transitioning from print story to movie. This story is not sunshine and happiness, it is depressing and it is going to have an effect upon you. These things just do not happen in suburbia, not in 1973, children do not go missing, children do not have bad things happen to them. That was the way things were until 14-year-old Susie Salmon doesn’t come home from school one day, and ultimately is never found at least not whole.

The man next door literally crafts a family’s worst nightmare when he murders their 14-year-old daughter and gives them a glimpse into the reality of the world. When Susie goes missing, any and everyone becomes a suspect in her disappearance, and it ultimately comes down to her father to find the man that killed his daughter when the police are not moving fast enough, or following up on the near paranoia that Mister Salmon has concerning their neighbor who gives him at times conflicting information but it takes him some time to figure it out.

Also, Susie’s heaven is a wonderful place, that actually looks somewhat like her school playground. In her heaven there are other children, and even some adults, but they all have one thing in common – they were murdered by the same twisted individual who at the moment lives next door to the Salmon family.

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations you can contact me at simplicity.kindreth@gmail.com
My reviews can be found here:
https://caedmoneries.wordpress.com
http://www.tumblr.com/caedy
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/caesreviews

Book Review: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (PPZ Prequel) by Steve Hockensmith

Title: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls
Author: Steve Hockensmith
Rating: 4/5

Summary: This book takes place four years before Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, it is the birth of a heroine. The Bennet sisters are enjoying their peaceful life in the English countryside, idle days filled with reading, gardening and daydreaming about future husbands. Then, at a funeral at the local perish changes everything when things take a rather unfortunate turn, and before the remainder of the corpses buried in the cemetery can begin to rise from the earth, there is one family that can stop them.

Elizabeth Bennet’s evolution from a naïve young teenager into a savage slayer of the undead begins, training beneath Master Hawksworth and Dr. Keckilpenny who wishes to use science instead of violence to rid the world of the undead problem.

Review: I’ve heard many things about Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and as I’ve read Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, I could not resist seeing what Steve Hockensmith had done to this timeless classic by adding the influence of the shambling, brain consuming undead. I loved reading this prequel, and now I will have to get my hands on Pride and Prejudice and Zombies to read what has become of Elizabeth Bennet and her siblings.

I did however, find myself missing Mr. Darcy a bit, but there were plenty of characters to fawn over and delight in. Some of them had me laughing quite a bit throughout the story. This story is quite humorous, and it made going out at night or even in the predawn hours a bit more creepy, considering that I tend to walk by a large open area, and then past heavily wooded areas that would be perfect for a zombie to come shambling out of! I need to read PPZ now and further follow the Bennet sisters in their quest to rid the world of the undead.

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations you can contact me at simplicity.kindreth@gmail.com
My reviews can be found here:
https://caedmoneries.wordpress.com
http://www.tumblr.com/caedy
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/caesreviews